Social Security update: Direct payment worth $914 arrives in 23 days

Social Security cards are shown.
Social Security cards are shown. (iStock)

Social Security update: Direct payment worth $914 arrives in 23 days

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The second round of payments of up to $914 for individual filers in September will go out to Supplemental Security Income recipients in 23 days as part of a rare double payment this month.

The second payment will go out on Friday, Sept. 29, and it will replace October’s payment. It falls nearly a month after the first payment, which went out Sept. 1. The double payment results from a scheduling quirk in the Social Security Administration’s calendar that gives recipients two payments in one month if the first day of the following month falls on a weekend.

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Recipients usually just receive one check each month, but there are four months in which beneficiaries get two checks this year: March, June, September, and December. This is because the first of the month is on a weekend in April, July, and October, and Jan. 1 is always a holiday.

In the rare instances that there are two payments in a month, the second is normally on the last day of the month. But in the case of October, the first is on a Sunday, placing the month’s payment on Sept. 29 instead of Sept. 30 because Sept. 30 is a Saturday.

The payment amount for beneficiaries varies depending on how they file for the benefits. For those who filed as individuals, the rate for payments is up to $914 per month. The rate for eligible couples is up to $1,371 per month. Essential persons, or those who live with someone receiving SSI and provide them with necessary care, get a monthly payment of $458.

In order to qualify for the Supplemental Security Income program, a person needs to be 65 or over and meet specific financial requirements. Those under 65 could also qualify if they are at least partially blind or have a physical or mental condition that seriously limits their daily activities for at least one year or is expected to result in death.

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Children can also qualify for SSI payments if they are at least partially blind or have a physical or mental condition that limits their daily activities for at least a year and their parents or legal guardians have limited income or savings.

The payments were first issued by the Social Security Administration in January 1974, and payment rates have increased for cost of living adjustments since 1975, according to the agency.

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